My Horn Isn’t Pretty, Does That Make It Bad?

We’ve all seen a professional musician playing on a beautiful instrument, one that is most likely way out of our budgets. Sometimes we start to look down on an instrument because it’s not “pretty,” and I think that’s a stigma we should break.

Your horn doesn’t have to be pretty to play well. It’s just a fact. Many of us receive our instruments as hand-me-downs, or maybe the ones we bought used have some finish imperfections and don’t look new or shiny. This is totally okay! Many professional players got famous on instruments that aren’t the best looking, and that’s because it’s about the sound of your instrument. Sure, it’s nice to have your instrument look super sparkly all the time, but not necessary.

I like to bring up the example of Louis Armstrong’s first cornet. It’s currently on display in the museum that was his home growing up, but that horn has a lot of issues, from an aesthetic and a repair standpoint.

https://acloserwalknola.com/places/louis-armstrongs-birthplace/
Louis Armstrong’s First Cornet

Obviously there are certain things we must consider; if there is an aesthetic “boo-boo” that disrupts the playing ability/functioning of the instrument, it’s time to take action, but most aesthetic issues don’t affect the instrument in that way.

What I’m trying to say is that you shouldn’t be discouraged if your horn doesn’t look awesome. If you enjoy playing it and it sounds good to you, that’s the baseline for what matters. If you’re concerned about the way your horn looks, bring it on in for me to take a look at! We can see if what’s going on has anything to do with structural integrity, or playability. We can discuss aesthetic-improving options. See you soon!

 

Trying to Buy For a Musician? Are You Stumped? We Can Help!!

Shopping for a musician and have no idea what to get them? We have your back. Here’s a list of our employee’s TOP 5 gifts you can find in our store this holiday season. All of these gifts are in stock now, so act quick and get yours before we run out!

John:
-Alfred’s Complete Essential’s for Music Theory $34.99
-Korg TM-60 Tuner/Metronome $39.95
-Any Heil Mic, starting at $109.95
-Mackie Mixer, starting at $109.95
-Tusq Acoustic Guitar Bridge Pins (easiest way to improve your guitar’s sound!), starting at $24.95

Ryan:
-Fishman FT-2 Tuner $14.95
-Lemon Oil for Fingerboards $4.95
-iRig interfaces, starting at $109.95
-Scarlett Focusrite Digital Audio Interfaces, starting at $109.99
-Mackie CR3 Monitors $109.99

Gary:
-John Pearse Alternative Material Picks, starting at $3
-Heil mics, starting at $109.95
-Casein or Tusq Bridge pins, starting at $24.95
-Casiotone CT-S200 Portable Keyboard $129.95
-Oasis instrument humidifier system $20.95

Nicole:
-Chopsavers Chapstick for Musicians $4.95
-Brass Mouthpiece Cleaning Brush $2.59
-Spiral Bound Manuscript Paper Notebook $4.99
-Scarlett Focusrite Digital Audio Interfaces, starting at $109.95
-Overscore Manuscript Tape $9.95

 

Meet Gary – Our Newest Member!

If you’ve been in the shop over the last month or so, you may have noticed a new addition to our team! We introduce to you… *drumroll please* Gary Rochussen!!

Gary is not only a local musician, but the owner of his own custom electronics and control plate company. You can find his shop, Tribute Guitarworks, on Reverb or Ebay! Gary has played guitar since he was about 5 years old. His very first guitar, a plastic Roy Rogers guitar, started him on his journey. Since then, Gary has created custom guitars, electronics, even amplifiers, and has become a highly skilled jazz and rock guitar player. 

We are extremely lucky to have Gary on our team, and we hope you like him as much as we do! If you have a guitar question, Gary is your guy. Come on by to meet the new friendly face if you haven’t already. 

Light vs. Dark Rosin; Violin, Viola, or Cello

In the world of rosin for bows there are two types of rosin–Light and Dark. Similar in pricing, what’s the difference between the two rosins? I’m so glad you asked. Let’s dive into that a little.

Rosin is, essentially, tree sap–it’s resin collected from pine and conifer trees that, when applied to the bow of an instrument, allow for friction between the bow and strings, which results in the vibration of the strings and sound.

Light rosin is a denser and less sticky, which makes it better for warmer and hotter climates, like the southern United States.

Dark rosin is a less dense rosin, and much stickier than light rosin which makes is great for dry and cold climates like here in New Hampshire!

We would recommend dark rosin if you live up here, but either will work for your instrument. Next time you’re in the store, ask to try some of our sample rosin and feel the difference.