April Restring Event – NYXL and Nickel Bronze

Attention all acoustic and electric guitar players!! This April, on Saturday, the 20th, we will be hosting a restring event featuring D’Addario’s NYXL and Nickel

NYXL and Nickel Bronze Strings Available

Bronze guitar strings.

So what’s the deal?

On April 20th, bring your 6-string acoustic or electric guitar into the store. When  you buy one pack of the NYXL or Nickel bronze strings, we will restring the guitar FOR FREE (normally a $20 service), and GIVE YOU another pack of the same strings. That’s right–Free restring and a free pack of strings when you buy one pack of D’Addario NYXL or Nickel Bronze strings.

 

NYXL Strings

Made out of a reformulated steel, the NYXL strings will “bend farther, sing louder, and stay in tune better than any string you’ve played before.” They “provide more strength and up to 131% greater tuning stability by utilizing a completely reinvented wire drawing process coupled with a revolutionary ‘fusion twist’ process for the plain steels” (D’Addario Co.). They also provide more high output and a enhanced mid-range frequencies. 

Nickel Bronze Strings

The Nickel Bronze Strings yield a “crisp and clear sound to accentuate the unique tone of your guitar.” They’re perfect for players that are looking for “the depth and projection of light gauge bottom strings, but slightly less tension on the high strings for easy bending” (D’Addario Co.). The strings provide brilliant projection, unrivaled clarity, and heavenly balances and overtones. 

We hope to see you there! One Day Only, While Supplies Last.

Recycle Your Metal Instrument Strings With Us!

Every time you change your guitar strings, metal is being added to a landfill. We’ve teamed up with D’Addario and their Play Back string recycling program to help our environment in an easy, friendly, and free way.

Image result for playback daddario

What is Play Back?

D’Addario’s Play Back recycling program is a free and easy way for you to recycle any brand of metal guitar strings. An estimated 1.5 million lbs of metal strings are put into a land fill every year, as they are not recycled through municipal recycling programs. All you have to do is bring any brand of old metal strings (guitar, mandolin, banjo; anything as long as it’s metal!) to the store and drop them in our drop box, located at the front desk. We take care of collection and shipping of the strings so you don’t have to. Any time, any metal strings, we have you covered.

No matter the brand, bring your metal strings in and help us keep landfills string free

 

Bass Guitar Wiring -> Before; During; After

Customer dropped off beautiful old bass guitar, had some rewiring done in 1975!  Owner stated it was cutting out and sometimes had no signal.

A little messy and maybe a little crusty

Got the go ahead to rewire with new pots and output jack but save the switches and capacitor.

Got all the crusty foil off

Got the new foil on and placed controls on the pick guard.

Got it all wired up.

All wired up

Wired in pickups and all is well.

New volume and tone control, output jack. Saved the capacitor and switches.

Got a question about the electronics in your guitar?  We can do most any electrical work on guitars.  Stop by and let’s take a look.

The First Instrument Your Tried Isn’t Working For You-Now What?

There are so many types of instruments, it’s hard to choose one. Whether you’re playing what your friend plays, or choosing something you love the sound of, sometimes it doesn’t work out. But don’t worry! It’s totally okay for it to not be a perfect match.

I started playing violin in 5th grade. I loved the sound of the instrument, and it was fun at first, but I quickly learned that string instruments were not my thing. I found myself dread

ing practicing, and playing it in lessons just didn’t make me happy. One of the best things my parents have ever done for me happened at that point; they told me I could switch instruments. For some reason the sound of the clarinet peaked me interest. I started lessons at school, and it was awesome! I enjoyed practicing, even when it was hard. I played clarinet for a few years, then took advantage of my wonderful band teachers at the middle and high school, and I tried a bunch of the instruments the school owned. I soon found myself wanting to play bassoon, and a few years later the trombone. It took me from 5th grade until my sophomore year of high school to find the trombone, and it’s my main instrument now. Although I loved many of the instruments I tried along the way, it took me awhile to find the one that was right for me.

As a student, my advice is to talk to your band teachers; they are there to help you, and more than likely have an instrument you can try. I’ve never met a teacher that wasn’t excited to see a kid want to learn another instrument. They are one of your greatest resources, especially if renting multiple instruments from a rental company isn’t in the budget.

To parents, having reflected upon what my parents did for me, my advice is to encourage your child to find the instrument they love. It’s hard to have put money and time into one instrument, and not have it work out, but you have resources to help you out with that. We have instruments here your child can give an initial play test, and their band teachers might have an extra instrument laying around for your kid to try. The best thing my parents did for me, throughout the years, was to encourage me to keep searching. They asked other parents, neighbors, and family members if they had or knew someone who had an instrument I could borrow if renting one wasn’t in the budget. They encouraged me to be the forger of my own music trail by investing $8 here or there on method books that are targeted at students teaching themselves. If you have questions about resources, or are unsure how to get an instrument in your kid’s hands, come talk to me or anyone at the store. The chances are we’ve been in your situation, or know someone who has been, and we are more than happy to help you help your child.

In the end, I want to remind you that it’s okay if the first instrument you try isn’t the one for you. Of course you should give it a worthwhile try to ensure it’s not a dislike due to a slight bump in the road, and you should try and find out if there is a way to try other instruments before switching, but it is totally okay. I did it, and so many other people I know did it too! If you want to try out an instrument you’re thinking of switching to, come in and sit with me! We can play together, or you can try it out in our private practice room. No matter where you are headed in your musical journey, I want to help. I’ll see you soon!